Saturday, February 27, 2010

Guest post on Ian's blog

I'm the guest blogger on Ian's blog. Actually, he tells me that I'm this this week's Super Guest Star, but I'd be too modest to say that. :) Anyway, check it out!

3 comments:

Murphy said...

Alicia:

The article is totally thought provoking! I wanted to leave a comment over at Ian's blog - but I had trouble. *sigh* Anyway, I really liked when you said:

Choose one point in your story where this character has to make a decision or take an action‑‑ important or trivial. Write two paragraphs deep in viewpoint, trying to show the uniqueness of this person's perspective. Keep it simple‑‑ you don't need to overdo it‑‑ but make it distinctly this character.

This is such a simple thing, really, but it can mean so much. A word or an action the character owns - it makes h/her more real. Someone the reader can relate to - I love it!

Thanks Alicia!

Edittorrent said...

I also have been thinking-- should write a post about this-- how your description should be filtered through the urgency == you notice what is relevant. So if the heroine thinks she's about to be fired, she isn't going to pay much narrative attention to the boss's twin upholstered chairs and the chintz draperies. Urgency levels count a lot in plausibility.

Alicia

Murphy said...

So if the heroine thinks she's about to be fired, she isn't going to pay much narrative attention to the boss's twin upholstered chairs and the chintz draperies.

Hmm...my heroine probably would because she'd be looking for a place to set the lit match. (hehehe)

Actually, I read a book recently, got to a part and thought - now you notice the color of his eyes? Are you freaking kidding me? It was so absurd - it pulled me right out. So yep, urgency level and plausibility go hand-in-hand.

Murphy